Publiée le mercredi 15 mai

How can senior managers get better, faster business decisions from the meetings they attend or lead? Certainly, getting steeped in best practices is wise, as there is a wealth of good thinking available on the topic of decision making. In the meantime, we recommend looking closer to home, namely at the preparation that should happen (but perhaps doesn’t) before your own meetings.

Publiée le mardi 07 mai

The evidence is clear: a small number of priority practices make the difference between an effective and fair performance-management approach and one that falls short. Organizations that link employee goals to business priorities, invest in managers’ capabilities, and differentiate rewards for the extremes of performance are 84 percent more likely to have performance-management approaches that their employees perceive and recognize as being fair. Furthermore, these practices are mutually reinforcing: implementing one practice well can have a positive effect on the performance of others, which leads to positive impact on employee and organizational performance, which, in turn, drives organizations to outperform peers.

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Publiée le dimanche 05 mai

We typically think of performance management as a system for managers to rate, review, and reward their direct reports. Done well, it lifts performance at the individual level and multiplies the effect across the entire organization.

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But it’s not just employees that need to be carefully managed. By extending the system to machines, resources, and processes, manufacturers are better able to identify problems before or as they happen, meaning managers and the front line can make real-time adjustments to keep production on track. And by better tracking and analyzing performance metrics, the best factories can identify new ways of working to trim costs and boost productivity and profitability.

Publiée le dimanche 05 mai

Making good business decisions is a critical part of every executive’s job and is vital to every company’s well-being. Yet in a new McKinsey Global Survey on the topic,1 only 20 percent of respondents say their organizations excel at decision making. Further, a majority say much of the time they devote to decision making is used ineffectively.

Publiée le dimanche 05 mai

Because AI is a relatively new force in business, few leaders have had the opportunity to hone their intuition about the full scope of societal, organizational, and individual risks, or to develop a working knowledge of their associated drivers, which range from the data fed into AI systems to the operation of algorithmic models and the interactions between humans and machines. As a result, executives often overlook potential perils (“We’re not using AI in anything that could ‘blow up,’ like self-driving cars”) or overestimate an organization’s risk-mitigation capabilities (“We’ve been doing analytics for a long time, so we already have the right controls in place, and our practices are in line with those of our industry peers”). It’s also common for leaders to lump in AI risks with others owned by specialists in the IT and analytics organizations (“I trust my technical team; they’re doing everything possible to protect our customers and our company”).

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Rebond : positionnons les dominos dans le bon sens

Nous ne vivons pas la même crise qu’en 2001 ou 2008. Ce sont nos choix collectifs qui vont en accélérer la sortie… ou en aggraver les effets. Soyons solidaires de nos réseaux de valeur !

 
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Mc Kinsey : COVID-19 and the employee experience: How leaders can seize the moment

As it turns out, most companies did a solid job of addressing their employees’ basic needs of safety, stability, and security during the first phase of the COVID-19 crisis. However, those needs are evolving, calling for a more sophisticated approach as organizations enter the next phase.

The return phase presents an opportunity for companies to rethink the employee experience in ways that respect individual differences—home lives, skills and capabilities, mindsets, personal characteristics, and other factors—while also adapting to rapidly changing circumstances. The good news is that with advances in listening techniques, behavioral science, advanced analytics, two-way communication channels, and other technologies, leaders can now address employee experience in a more targeted and dynamic way. While drilling down on which employees need more and varied types of support, they can also tailor actions that create widely shared feelings of well-being and cohesion across the workforce.