Publiée le vendredi 26 janvier

Companies know where they want to go. They want to be more agile, quicker to react, and more effective. They want to deliver great customer experiences, take advantage of new technologies to cut costs, improve quality and transparency, and build value.

Publiée le jeudi 25 janvier

Organizational transformations are hard work, and according to the latest McKinsey Global Survey on the topic,1companies are no more successful at overhauling their performance and organizational health than they were ten years ago.2A particular blind spot seems to be the failure to involve frontline employees and their managers in the effort.


Publiée le jeudi 25 janvier
Let’s face it: business models are less durable than they used to be. The basic rules of the game for creating and capturing economic value were once fixed in place for years, even decades, as companies tried to execute the same business models better than their competitors did. But now, business models are subject to rapid displacement, disruption, and, in extreme cases, outright destruction. 
Publiée le mercredi 24 janvier

As new markets emerge, profit pools shift, and digital technologies pervade more of everyday life, it’s easy to assume that the economy’s digitization is already far advanced. According to our latest research, however, the forces of digital have yet to become fully mainstream. On average, industries are less than 40 percent digitized, despite the relatively deep penetration of these technologies in media, retail, and high tech.

Publiée le mardi 23 janvier

Corporate short-termism has been the subject of ongoing debate among leaders in business, government, and academia for more than 30 years, but hard evidence that short-termism genuinely detracts from company performanceand economic growth has remained scarce. To fill this gap and better understand capitalism for the long term, we have created a systematic measurement of long- and short-termism at the company level. Our findings show that companies we classify as “long term” outperform their shorter-term peers on a range of key economic and financial metrics (exhibit).

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Rebond : positionnons les dominos dans le bon sens

Nous ne vivons pas la même crise qu’en 2001 ou 2008. Ce sont nos choix collectifs qui vont en accélérer la sortie… ou en aggraver les effets. Soyons solidaires de nos réseaux de valeur !

 
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Mc Kinsey : COVID-19 and the employee experience: How leaders can seize the moment

As it turns out, most companies did a solid job of addressing their employees’ basic needs of safety, stability, and security during the first phase of the COVID-19 crisis. However, those needs are evolving, calling for a more sophisticated approach as organizations enter the next phase.

The return phase presents an opportunity for companies to rethink the employee experience in ways that respect individual differences—home lives, skills and capabilities, mindsets, personal characteristics, and other factors—while also adapting to rapidly changing circumstances. The good news is that with advances in listening techniques, behavioral science, advanced analytics, two-way communication channels, and other technologies, leaders can now address employee experience in a more targeted and dynamic way. While drilling down on which employees need more and varied types of support, they can also tailor actions that create widely shared feelings of well-being and cohesion across the workforce.